Look Before You Leap: Career Advice for Legal Technology Pros

Career advice to help legal technology professionals decide whether they should leave their jobs.As a recruitment firm, we’re big believers in making career moves that help you advance and achieve greater job satisfaction. We’ve also warned about the risks associated with taking a counteroffer. But there’s a third option, one that happens before either the job seeking or counteroffer stage—evaluating whether or not you should leave your law firm or legal technology department in the first place.

This is an important starting point—and one you shouldn’t race over. Before making the leap to leave your legal tech job, consider the following five areas of opportunity at your current place of employment.

1. Compensation: Can You Earn A Competitive Salary?

There are several publications that offer salary information for the legal industry. For example, the Association of Legal Administrators, the International Legal Technology Association (ILTA), and ESP Legal all publish free salary guides revealing average technology and litigation support compensation trends. Peruse these guides and see where you land. Are you being paid a competitive salary given the size and location of your firm, the other benefits (such as health insurance) provided to you, and your years of experience in the industry?

If you feel you are being underpaid, can you meet with your manager and share your concern? Without mounting a case against anyone or threatening to leave, present the market information and salary statistics you’ve discovered to support your claim that your wages fall below average. Then, give you firm a chance to consider and respond. Many firms will try to adjust to bring you in line with market standards—but you may have to wait until your next review.

2. Career Growth: Can You Advance and Reach Your Goals?

Talk with your manager and ask what opportunities your firm has for advancement—and what steps you can take to ensure you’re on the right track for long-term growth. Your desire to move up the ladder should go hand in hand with your desire to learn, so during this conversation, ask your supervisor for ongoing guidance as a mentor and find out what other training and educational benefits your firm provides. Educational reimbursement, for example, could help you earn your college degree or MBA or even a certain technical certification. All of these actions will enhance your skill growth and make you a better internal candidate to promote.

Sometimes, there are no avenues for upward mobility within your department and you need to look outside of your organization. But even then, one of the hardest career moves to make is to get hired as a manager without any management experience. So again, look to your current employer to gain further experience before you try making a leap. Ask to lead a project or mentor the junior staff. Who knows—maybe showing that initiative will get you a promotion after all.

3. Work-Life Balance: Do You Have Job Flexibility and Healthy Work Boundaries?

The hours you put in—and are expected to put in—whether or not you take work home or are always “on call,” your commute, and your ability to work remotely or flex your time are all important considerations when it comes to long-term job satisfaction. Some things—like your commute—may not be adjustable . . . but things like your ability to work remotely certainly could be.

Talk with your firm about your schedule and see if you can realign some of your tasks and/or working arrangements to better suit your at-home needs. Start small—for example, delegating one project or beginning to work remotely on a trial basis once a week and extending that to two or three days a week over time if the arrangement is serving the best interests of both you and your firm.

4. Benefits: Do the Perks Round Out Your Employment Package?

Sometimes a firm can’t give you a salary increase but can give you a bigger bonus or increase your paid vacation time as an incentive. In addition to flexible work arrangements, medical benefits, and education reimbursement (all of which we’ve already mentioned), profit sharing, stock options, PTO, 401(k) plans, HSAs, childcare assistance, pet insurance, student loan forgiveness, and other smaller in-office perks are part of the “package” your firm has to offer, and they should be considered as a collective whole along with your salary when assessing the fairness of your compensation plan.

Talk with your manager or HR representative to see what options you might have. And, if you are actively looking for new opportunities, carefully evaluate how changes to these benefits could affect your overall take-home pay.

5. Leadership: Do You Respect and Get Along with the People In Charge?

If you love your job but hate your boss, you already know you’re in a difficult position. Statistics have shown that 75% of turnover can be influenced by managers. We recommend having a heart-to-heart with your boss before reporting any dissatisfactory behavior to HR or higher and also before making a career change. Your boss may not know how you and others feel and may be open to changing the behavior and your interactions in a way that better suits your work style. Don’t you always appreciate when someone comes to you to try to work out a problem instead of going behind your back? Who knows—when your boss sees you as a straight shooter and someone who is trustworthy, your relationship may improve more than you could have ever imagined!

If, however, your boss won’t hear you out, doesn’t change the behavior, and is creating a negative working environment for you and others—it’s time to seek a new opportunity. You can go to HR, but they will likely already be aware of the situation, and your conversation may not result in a change. What’s worse, HR will need to inform your boss of your report, which could make your life even more miserable. Sometimes, it’s not a matter of avoiding the leap but knowing when the time is right to make it.

 

There’s not always a way to advance your career and increase your financial earnings without exploring new job opportunities. If you’ve thought through these five areas and have come to that conclusion, let us know—we’re always here to help you find your best legal technology fit. But if you see untapped areas of opportunity where you’re currently working, we hope you will take some steps to improve your job situation and grow where you’re already planted.

The key to taking a leap and landing on your feet is intentionality. Whatever you decide, move forward with confidence until you reach your full potential.

Ready to take the leap? Our ESP Legal technical recruiters will help you speed up the process and land somewhere that aligns with your needs in all of these areas.

Get in Touch with a Recruiter

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How to Retain Top Legal Technology Employees in a Competitive Market

Tips to help you keep the best legal technology professionals on your team.We’ve shared about the importance of attracting top legal technology talent to your firm. Not only do legal technology professionals ensure law firms remain secure, competitive, and efficient—they’ve completely revolutionized the legal industry, generating an ever-increasing demand for “digital lawyers” and “eDiscovery” experts.

But what happens after you fill your legal technology roles? In today’s competitive market, retention is just as—if not more—important as making a smart hire. The following five recommendations will help your firm avoid the losses associated with filling an open position so you can instead focus your energy on taking advantage of the latest legal technology trends to serve your clients.

1. Develop and Promote Flexible Working Hours

Work-life balance perks are among the top concerns of technology candidates in the legal market today. They want the option to work remotely—at least part time—to flex their hours, and to take sick and family leave, among other benefits. If you don’t already have a generous telecommuting policy, consider implementing one to stay competitive with other firms. If you do, ensure your employees feel empowered to take advantage of your system and that there aren’t any unwritten cultural norms or biases holding them back.

We’re all about seeking win-win solutions at ESP Legal (we even put it in our values statement), so let us be the first to remind you: offering the option to work remotely is as beneficial for your firm as it is for your technology professionals. Take advantage of this effective, easy-to-implement benefit.

2. Train and Mentor Your Team

Paid training and education ranked as the number one most desirable benefit in our 2019 Salary Guide market insights—even above flexible working hours. Research has shown that the opportunity to grow and develop is an especially big driver for millennials. And a recent survey revealed that 34% of tech pros looking for new jobs in 2019 have been motivated primarily by a desire for a higher degree of responsibility. The same survey also revealed there is a 31% gap between the number of tech pros who rank “training and education” as an important benefit and the number who actually receive this benefit—which means this is a major area of opportunity where your firm can stand out from the rest.

As you look for ways to raise up your employees, especially consider how you are empowering and encouraging your female technology professionals to claim ownership over their positions and grow to become leaders in your technology department. Intentionally providing opportunities for diverse voices to be heard contributes to the overall health and innovation of your IT team—another one of those win-win solutions.

3. Keep Compensation Competitive

The Association of Legal Administrators and the International Legal Technology Association (ILTA) are great resources for detailed compensation guidelines, and ESP Legal also publishes a free annual salary guide revealing average technology, litigation support, and attorney compensation trends. While not all retention-promoting benefits are strictly compensatory (see numbers 2 and 4 on this list), you’ll want to ensure that, at the very least, you are paying your legal technology employees a fair wage—especially considering that annual wage increases have become an expectation in today’s hot legal technology job market.

4. Focus on Medical Benefits and Other Perks

The cost of medical coverage can vary drastically from one firm to the next and can be a big factor for job seekers. In fact, 85% of technology professions list health insurance as one of their two most important benefits, according to a 2019 survey. With rising medical costs, it’s important to compare your company’s out-of-pocket insurance premium with the out-of-pocket expenses generated by some of your competitors’ medical plans. Once you’re confident your firm is offering a solid benefit, leverage your medical plan and promote it to your technology professionals in a way that helps them see more tangibly the cost savings afforded by your policy.

As an example, if the average law firm’s employees were paying $550 per paycheck or $1100 a month for medical coverage and yours costs $500 a month, this results in a $600 monthly savings or $7,200 a year in added benefits. Make sure your legal technology pros are aware of these kinds of numbers.

5. Outsource Your Hiring

One of the biggest reasons law firms lose technology employees boils down to bad hiring decisions. Luckily, this is also one of the most avoidable factors crushing your retention rates. When you solicit the help of a trusted recruitment firm like ESP Legal, you see and interview only those candidates who are going to add value to your team in the long run. We consider things like the alignment of compensatory expectations with what your firm is able to offer, culture fit, and how the long-term opportunities provided by your company might align with a candidate’s aspirations.

Plus, when you work with a recruitment firm, you save time and speed up the hiring process, which puts less burden on the rest of your technology department to make up for the lost productivity that results from the open position—thus helping you avoid the pitfalls of losing excellent legal technology professionals to burnout.

 

When you empower your legal technology employees to succeed, you directly impact your firm’s ability to thrive in today’s fast-paced and ever-evolving legal landscape. By staying competitive and aware of industry trends, you’ll ensure your firm’s many positive qualities and fun culture shine through and keep your technology professionals committed to succeeding as a part of your team.

If you’re looking for more personalized advice, our ESP Legal account managers would be thrilled to discuss your unique retention challenges and help you find the best solutions.

Get in Touch with an Account Manager

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Telecommuting – It’s Good for Employers in the Legal Tech Niche

3 Reasons Remote Work is a Great for Legal Tech EmployersToday, technology has connected us in powerful ways. With smart phones in our hands, we literally have the world at our fingertips – especially when it comes to business. We take conference calls on the road, check and send emails at lunch, and remain available even when traveling. In a way, we are always reachable, and expected to be so.

With this expectation, many of us are already working remotely throughout the workweek. Yet, some law firms are still skeptical about integrating telecommuting into their business and hiring models. Well, as we are on the heels of a new year, it’s time to face the fact; telecommuting is here to stay. But don’t worry – telecommuting is beneficial to the employer, too.

Hire the Best Talent

When it comes to finding and hiring the best talent, the option of telecommuting greatly opens the talent pool. For starters, you can say goodbye to geographical limitations and hello to the perfect candidate.

As law firms begin their candidate search, from Attorneys and Secretaries to IT Managers and Programmers, they know they need top talent to compete in a competitive marketplace. However, not many law firms know they should be seeking out candidates with telecommuting in mind, in order to obtain that top talent.

As the worlds of tech and legal meet, this becomes an issue, since the tech industry has long embraced remote workers. According to a Monster article, “The tech industry is well known for its flexible schedules and telecommuting opportunities. Which makes sense considering most tech companies are web based and that technology is the greatest resource when working from home. With video chats, conference calls, VPN networks, and wireless internet, we can constantly stay connected as though we were sitting in our office rather than at home.”

So, what does this mean for legal? The best tech talent has already experienced the luxury of telecommuting, and furthermore, they’ve come to expect it.

The nature of IT is very demanding because technology can fail anytime, and therefore support is needed at all hours. Fewer on-site IT resources are necessary thanks to programs like GotoAssist and TeamViewer where connecting to the PC remotely can solve most problems. Support centers are already operating like this, so why wouldn’t you? Denying the option of telecommuting could prohibit your firm from acquiring the best talent.

Enhanced Productivity

Remote Workers are Happier and More ProductiveThink that working from home causes more distractions and less productivity? Think again. Research indicates that employees use their time more efficiently at home. One potential reason being that more distractions are present in the workplace. In a study conducted by Stanford professor, Nick Bloom, the benefits of working from home were evaluated. The results revealed that home workers were more productive, made more work calls, took shorter breaks and less sick days, and best of all, reported being happier than their counterpart office workers.

Happier Employees, Better Retention, and More Money

Working from home offers the employee many reasons to be happy: no commute time, a flexible schedule, less company politics, healthier at-home lunch options, and more. According to a study by communication researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, teleworkers experience lower amount of stress and less distractions, and therefore report beingmore satisfied with their jobs compared to those working mostly in the office because working remotely alleviates more stress than it creates.”

Bloom explains that employee happiness in working where they desire to, whether at home or in the office, is crucial to employee retention. Retaining quality staff will save the company recruitment, training, and loss of productivity expenses. If tech issues remain unresolved for long periods of time due to short staffing, your company becomes at risk for dissatisfied high-level staff and missed deadlines.

Cost benefits also include reduced office space and other office fees. Telecommuting requires that the employee use their own furniture, electricity, and other utilities, therefore saving the company money. An estimated $2,000 per employee could be saved each year on office expenses, Bloom finds.

When it comes to your firm’s bottom line you might want consider hiring a remote worker. Of course, telecommuting is not for every personality type, but it can certainly be used as a great employee retention and top-talent recruiting tool.

If you are looking to work remotely, or to hire a remote worker contact us for current openings at careers@esp-ca.com or 949.753.7575. ESP Legal focuses exclusively on matching top legal technology, litigation, and attorney talent with the best law firm opportunities.

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