Finding Your Ideal Law Firm Culture

You spend a LOT of time at work, and while much of your job satisfaction comes from the actual work you do, a large part of it also come from the work culture you’re in. The term “culture fit” gets tossed around as one of the most important factors for both job seekers and employers. But, what does culture fit actually mean? How can you evaluate a law firm’s culture?

Finding Your Ideal Law Firm Culture

For clarification, a healthy law firm culture isn’t about everyone getting along, hanging out on the weekends together, sharing the same interests, or working exactly the same way. Studies have actually shown that the variant perspectives derived from social, racial, and gender diversity, lead to more innovation, better problem-solving, and an improved bottom-line. So a healthy culture isn’t about sameness, but rather about operating from a shared set of values. For example, one law firm may have values of being results-oriented, compassionate, and client-focused, while another values employees who are detail-oriented, respectful, and have fun.

While there is no foolproof way to determine with certainty during the interview process that a potential partnership between an employee and a law firm will work well, our tips below are a good start for evaluating culture fit during the interview process.

What Do You Read?

Before the interview, do a little online research on the law firm to learn more about their values and personality:

  • Are you able to find the values, vision, and/or mission of the law firm on their website? If so, do they align with your own values and vision for your work?
  • What kind of tone does the website use—is it factual and to the point, or more friendly and casual?
  • On their careers page, what words do they use to describe their employees or team? What benefits or perks does the page highlight?
  • Do they promote press about themselves? What do these articles say about the firm?
  • Look at the leadership page and read the bios if they are there. How does what’s highlighted in these bios reveal the law firm’s values?
  • Can you find videos created by the firm? Does the firm have profiles on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, or Instagram? What do these other channels reveal about the law firm’s culture and values?
  • Do they mention pro bono work or charitable efforts? Is this important to you?
  • Look for online reviews from employees and clients. Take these with a grain of salt—the majority of online reviews are complaints, not compliments—but take notice of any patterns in the reviews. If something really jumps out as a potential red flag, prepare to address it before accepting or declining an offer.

Keep in mind, what you see online might not be the whole truth. What a firm claims on their website might not actually exist in the real world and an online review from a disgruntled employee doesn’t reveal the whole story. Still, this online research is a good starting point for developing questions to ask in the interview, observations you’d like to make, and ultimately assessing if the law firm is a good fit for you.

What Do You See?

As you enter a potential future work environment, be ready to take notice of specific choices made by the law firm about the space:

  • Is it an open office set up, or more of an office environment?
  • Is it buzzing with activity, or relatively quiet.
  • Are there private meeting spaces and/or soft furniture areas designed for collaboration?
  • Does the decor give a sense of the culture of the place—are wall decorations inspirational, fun, or traditional?
  • What is the lobby like—bright colored, modern, muted, or dated?
  • Are employees dressed casually in jeans or in traditional business attire?
  • Is there a shared eating area? How is it laid out and furnished?

Set your observations aside as you begin your interview, but plan on assessing them later. Maybe you know that you work better in quiet privacy or that having a nice place to take a break during your day makes you more productive. These environmental things might not seem like they reflect a companies values, but they are usually related. For example, an open office set up is more common at a law firm that values collaboration while as enclosed offices imply that privacy is more highly-valued. The work environment is not the most important aspect of a job, but it is worth considering before accepting a job offer.

What Do You Hear?

Some aspects of culture can easily be discussed in an interview and you should come prepared to ask questions that help you understand the culture of the law firm:

  • How are decisions usually made and communicated at this law firm?
  • What motivates people to stay at this firm long-term?
  • What challenges is the law firm facing and how will those challenges be addressed?
  • What do successful employees look like at this firm?
  • What is the leadership style here?
  • What’s your favorite aspect of working at the law firm?
  • How do you feel the values of the organization are lived out?

In addition to these specific questions, you can understand more about the law firm’s culture by evaluating the questions your interviewer asks you, their interview style, and the things they share with you about the job. There aren’t necessarily right or wrong answers to these questions—what might be a nightmare culture for one person could be an ideal culture for another. Notice if any parts of the conversation raise alarms for you, or conversely, sound highly appealing.

Whether you’ve been burned by a poor culture fit in the past, have had such a good fit you hardly know what we’re talking about, or are somewhere in between, we firmly believe you’ll be your most productive and happiest self when you’re working for a law firm that’s the right culture fit for you. We love helping technologists, litigation support professionals, and attorneys understand what they’re looking for when it comes to law firm culture.

Chat with one of our recruiters today!

Facebook Twitter Linkedin Reddit Email

Nonverbal Techniques to Impress Your Interviewer in 8 Easy Steps

Nonverbal Interview TipsDid you know some interviewers say that within the first 30-90 seconds of meeting a candidate, they already know whether or not they’ll hire them? How can this be possible? Nonverbal communication has a huge impact on the impression you make on your interviewer. Before you even begin to talk about your skills, your interviewer is watching your behavior, and deciding whether or not to write you off.

Unfortunately, more often than not, law firms are looking to screen out potential candidates, which may mean that great candidates could get passed over because of something small. The good news is that nonverbal communication is easy to practice – and we’ve got some tips for how to make a great first impression:

1. Smile!

It may seem obvious, but smiling at the start of your interview (and even before when you’re waiting in the lobby) will not only have an effect on your interviewer’s first impression of you, it will actually impact how well you do in the interview. Research has shown that smiling can decrease stress, lower your blood pressure, and make you feel more relaxed and happy. What a great help at the start of an interview! 38% of surveyed bosses said that not smiling is a common interview mistake. It might convey nervousness or even make you seem unfriendly. In fact, people see smiling people as more intelligent, sincere, and reliable than people who don’t smile. Try to think positive, friendly thoughts so that your smile comes naturally as you’re greeting your interviewer, and try to maintain a positive expression on your face throughout the interview—without letting your smile become fake.

2. Make Eye Contact

Another commonly reported interview mistake is the candidate’s failure to make eye contact with their interviewer. In the first 15-30 seconds of your interview, eye contact is your first opportunity to make a connection with your interviewer. Often when candidates are nervous, they have a tendency to avoid eye contact, or, of equal concern, stare intensely without blinking at their interviewer. Throughout the interviewer, work to make natural eye contact like you would if you were having a conversation with a friend.

3. Give a Confident Handshake

We’re sure you’ve heard before that a weak handshake is an interview ‘No.’ As with the two tips prior, moderation here is key: you neither want to present a limp grip, nor one that is too strong. A good handshake demonstrates your confidence, assurance, and personability. Your handshake will go hand-in-hand (apologies for the pun) with your smile and eye contact to make that first 30 second impression that could make or break your interview. Practice these three tips in tandem with your family, friends, and at networking meetings to make a perfect nonverbal impression at your next interview.

4. Strike the Right Posture

Once you’ve nailed your greeting, you’ll usually be invited to sit, and your posture is important. Slouching actually makes you smaller and gives you the appearance of lacking confidence. If you lean back too much in your chair, you might come across as disinterested or overly confident, but if you sit too straight, you might appear nervous. This might seem like a lot to remember, but if you aim for straight but not stiff, natural but engaged, you’re likely to hit the right tone with your interviewer.

5. Don’t Cross Your Arms

Crossing your arms over your chest can feel like a natural, comfortable way to sit, but non-verbally you’re giving off the message that you’re closed-off or ready to go on the defensive. Keeping your arms and hands relaxed in your lap or rested on the table, will prevent you from making this unwelcome impression (and can actually help you perform better in your interview).

6. Minimize Hand Gestures and Fidgeting

Using your hands too much in an interview can be distracting for your interviewer. You want them focused on your skills and stories, not the way your hands are moving in front of you. Similarly, fidgeting in your seat, readjusting your position too many times, touching your face, or playing with your hair, can make you appear distracted, disinterested, or nervous. To prevent yourself from these behaviors, clasp your hands in your lap. You can use them from time to time, but starting from this position – and returning to it after you’ve made your point –will keep you just conscious enough of your use of them, without distracting you from answering well.

7. Wear the Right Attire

Of course one of the first things that will create an impression is what you’re wearing. Do as much research as possible before the interview to find out what the dress code is at the law firm and try to dress in line, or one “step-up”. Most managers prefer candidates to avoid bright colors or wild patterns, but the most important thing is that you look polished—no matter what level of dress code is appropriate. Avoid wrinkles, flashy jewelry, chipped fingernails, ill-fitting clothes, etc.

8. Watch Your Tone

Your tone of voice can also have more impact than you know. Try to make yourself sound cheerful, friendly, and confident. Avoid “up-talking” at the end of your sentences, as that will make you seem uncertain or young. Vary your tone to keep your interviewers engaged.

If you haven’t interviewed in awhile, or aren’t finding success when you interview, your nonverbal communication could be the key to getting your interviewer to lean in with interest. Make a great first impression by dressing the part, being friendly with your facial expressions and body posture, and minimizing distractions in the interview. Practicing with a friend, family member, or recruiter will give you the confidence you need to nail these nonverbal techniques in your next interview and have the law firm offering you your dream job.

Contact an ESP Legal Recruiter for Personalized Interview Advice!

For more job seeking tips, check out these articles:

·      Are Counteroffers Really a Bad Idea?

·      3 Ways For Legal Tech Pros to Succeed at Interviewing Your Interviewer

·      7 Tips To Make The Most of Your Skype Interview

 

This blog was originally published in 2014 and has been updated to reflect current trends. 

Facebook Twitter Linkedin Reddit Email