How to Snag Top Legal Tech Talent in a Tight Market

Tips to snag top legal tech talent in a tight market

Hiring the best talent is critical to a law firm’s success, and because technology and security are more important than ever in the legal industry, finding top IT talent to support your attorneys and staff is an imperative part of that hiring equation.

The thing is . . . you’re not the only firm looking to find a great fit for a legal tech role. According to a recent survey, approximately 50% of firms and legal departments may be looking to do the same. But that doesn’t mean you should settle for a mediocre IT candidate. These three steps can help guide you along the path to finding the legal tech talent you need—even in a tight market.

Step 1: Plan with Your Ideal Candidate in Mind

If you start your search for a new tech candidate with low expectations, you may just get what you planned for. Instead, set the bar high by investing thoughtful, strategic time in dreaming up your ideal fit. Clearly define the role and craft a detailed working description of the job or contract position. Identify what the person should accomplish in his or her first 90, 180, and 365 days working for your firm. Then, present this to your stakeholders for input on their needs and make any necessary adjustments.

And don’t forget to consider soft skills and other qualifications you won’t necessarily see highlighted on a technical resume. For instance, what kind of person would fit in best with your firm’s culture—both in terms of similarities and perhaps needed differences that would bring your team a more diverse set of skills and experiences?

Once you know who you’re looking for, determine what your firm has to offer that person. Consider things such as:

  • What differentiates your company?
  • What salary budget range do you have to work with?
  • What benefits do you have to offer (think: healthcare, health savings accounts, short-term disability, life insurance, profit sharing, retirement plan contributions)?
  • Are those benefits competitive with the market today?
  • What soft perks might you be able or willing to negotiate (think: flex time, remote work, paid training or other further education, and in-office perks)?

Rather than feeling intimidated by the tight legal tech job market, remember that your firm has a lot to offer—and don’t forget to highlight those things during steps 2 and 3!

Step 2: Recruit Tech Talent with Determination

You’ve got the who and what down. Now the question is: where will you find this legal IT pro of your dreams?

When it comes to hiring top talent in a tight market, you have to put in more work at this stage than simply posting the opening on your website and job boards. Keeping in mind the ideal candidate you dreamed up during step 1, consider where you may find this person. Are there certain alumni networks, other firms, or events that he or she may be a part of? You could do the hard work of scoping out these options and doing some recruiting work yourself, or you may consider reaching out to an industry-specific staffing firm and sharing these insights so an account manager can start scoping out your market for you.

Whichever option you choose, your recruitment strategy should also include networking and relevant promotion of the opportunity. You may consider posting the opening on industry-specific job boards such as ILTA or ALA, or simply searching those boards for creative leads on your next great hire.

Finally, involve others at your firm in the recruitment and hiring process, and make it clear to candidates that they may interview with HR representatives, the hiring manager, coworkers, stakeholders, and firm partners. Candidates in today’s market want to know that they are a cohesive part of your team, and being clear on this upfront with both candidates and your team internally is a win-win.

Step 3: Be Choosy in Your Selection and Competitive in Your Offer

Though you should have a clear timeline for the interview and hiring process (both internally and one that you can communicate to candidates), as with step 1, keep your expectations high and only screen and interview IT pros who have the skills required to help your firm succeed. Then, once you’ve narrowed the pool a bit, consider the culture fit and soft skill criteria you identified in step 1, and seek alignment by utilizing third party personality profile testing tools such as DiSC, Predictive Index, CliftonStrengths, or Myers-Briggs Type Indicator.

Make sure each of your prospective candidates feels appreciated and respected throughout the interviewing process. Remember: while you’re the one doing the interviewing, your interviewees will likely be assessing your firm as well and weighing all of their options given the hot job market. So, it’s important that you are transparent about the interviewing and onboarding processes and your workplace environment, that you’re clear about the kind of professional experience you’re looking for, and that you recognize top tech talent for their skills and accomplishments.

Finally, when you’re ready to make an offer to a candidate, be competitive. Though money isn’t everything, put forth a salary and bonus potential that is, at minimum, fair and in accordance with industry standards. And don’t overlook the importance of nontraditional benefits, especially if you’re not able to meet the preferred salary of your top candidate. Consider whether you can sweeten some of your work-life balance perks (the number one concern of candidates in the market today) from what you originally proposed. Or maybe throw in a more unique and surprising perk, such as pet insurance (one in three Fortune 500 companies now offer this) to stand out from other firms.

Your last step of the search for a great legal IT pro should be to conduct a background check as permitted by law. After all, you’ve made it this far—you and your new hire should both be able to enter into the working arrangement with total confidence.

 

Though the market for legal tech talent is tight, your firm is not without options. With the right planning, preparation, and recruitment strategy, and a smooth interviewing and hiring process, you can fill your empty seat quickly and ensure your firm stays innovative and competitive in an increasingly technical legal environment.

If you’d like to streamline your search for the ideal legal tech candidate and receive additional market and industry hiring insights, our ESP Legal account managers are always happy to help.

Start Your Hiring Search Today

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How to Make a Great Career Move in a Hot Legal Tech Job Market

Make the right legal tech career moveGreat news for IT pros working in the legal industry: you’re more in demand than ever before. An estimated 75% of companies are planning to increase the number of full-time IT employees on their teams in 2019. And one recent survey revealed more than 50% of firms and legal departments plan to increase their investment in technology in the coming years.

The hot legal tech job market not only means increased job security and higher pay—it also means now is the ideal time to make a move that advances your career. The following five steps will help you leverage your skills and expertise to land your next great fit.

Step 1: Develop a Strategy

Despite the hot job market, when seeking a new opportunity, you still need to do the due diligence required of any job search. Start with an honest assessment of your IT skills: evaluate your strengths and weaknesses and your favorite and least favorite facets of your current role. Then consider how you would like to advance and grow professionally.

Once you’ve honed in on what you’d like to do, consider where you’d like to be doing it. Conduct research to get a sense of the firms you might work for and their reputation in the legal industry. Determine the kind of workplace culture you’re looking for, and see if any of the firms you researched align with your ideal.

Finally, address the how of your job search. Do you have any professional connections at the firms that most pique your interest? Would you prefer to work with an industry expert recruiter who can help you leverage the market and provide the inside scoop on companies and managers? Being intentional about how you plan to take action will help you land an interview faster and propel you toward step 2.

Step 2: Present Yourself Professionally

This step is about highlighting your skills and interest level to your prospective employer and positioning yourself for success down the road during step 5 (hint: it’s all about negotiating).

Here are a few specific tips to help you put your best foot forward from the start to the finish of your job search:

  • Ensure your resume is error free and formatted professionally.
  • Update your technical resume’s content, highlighting any skills that align with the job description requirements listed for the position you are applying for. (Yes, this means you have to tweak your resume each and every time you apply for a new gig).
  • Review and update any virtual professional resources, including your LinkedIn profile and any digital portfolios. And don’t forget to do a quick scan of your personal social media accounts to ensure there isn’t any less-than-professional content to be found!
  • Add additional specific, applicable details about your unique qualifications in your cover letter (which, like your resume, should be error free and formatted professionally). Answer the question: Why are you a good fit for this opportunity, and why do you want to work for this firm?
  • Dress up for your interview (even a video interview) whether or not the firm has a casual dress code. Make sure everything about your appearance is in line with the industry you are working in.

These small but significant choices can make a huge impact on a prospective employer. Plus, when you present yourself professionally, you increase your chances of being heard and taken seriously. Which brings you to . . .

Step 3: Make a Lasting First Impression

Even though your skills are in-demand, you shouldn’t approach your interview with the expectation of being wooed by the law firm. During your conversation, focus on the firm’s needs and how you can assist them—not your needs. You will get a chance to address your needs later in the process.

Show the firm you are informed and prepared by asking thoughtful questions inspired by your research (step 1). But try to keep a 50–50 balance between talking and listening. Be aware of your body language, and show your interviewer that you are interested and engaged by maintaining eye contact.

Come prepared with upbeat, articulate responses to a handful of potential interview questions. ESP Legal’s interviewing tips for job seekers address the three biggest ones: “Tell me about a time when . . .,” “Tell me about yourself,” and “What is your greatest weakness?” Read up to learn what key information your interviewer may be trying to uncover by asking one of these questions, and then spend some time crafting your responses.

When you put in the work and come to your interview prepared, you’ll leave feeling confident. But there’s still one more step for you to take before receiving an offer. 

Step 4: Follow Up

Send a professional follow up email or handwritten note. This is a very important step and should not be overlooked as an empty formality or outdated courtesy.

Your follow-up is an opportunity for you to show you were paying attention by touching on some of the topics discussed in the interview. It’s also a final opportunity for you to remind the firm of your strengths and promote additional qualifications that you may have forgotten to mention during the interview.

Keep the tone of your note positive and professional, and maintain that positivity and professionalism even if you need to wait a while for a response. Remember, you may have been their first—and hopefully best—interview. Filling a role takes time. 

Step 5: Negotiate

If you’ve shined during steps 1–4, chances are you’ll soon be presented with an offer. But you haven’t reached the finish line of the job search process just yet. This is the step where the opportunities afforded to you by the hot job market really come into play.

A quick disclaimer: negotiation is not about upping your financial requirements once you’ve won a firm over. Be honest and up-front with your compensatory expectations prior to the interview so there are no surprises. The only exception to this rule happens when unplanned circumstances create variance, i.e. you just got a raise that was unexpected in your current job or received a competitive offer from another firm.

That said, sometimes a firm will come in below the target salary you presented, and when that happens, you should discuss and consider the other benefits and financial incentives being offered that could offset the difference. These may include perks such as profit sharing, 401(k) matching, a great medical plan, a flexible and/or remote working schedule, and greater vacation allowances and/or PTO.

Finally, keep in mind that sometimes making a career move isn’t about money. Sometimes you’ll move because you’re looking for a different company culture or looking to make a switch to a different tech area of focus. In these cases, be honest with yourself about your decision. Landing an opportunity that offers you the career potential you’re seeking at a great company is often worth a small trade-off financially.

 

In a hot job market, you don’t need to stress about landing a gig simply to pay the bills. You have the freedom to focus on your long-term career goals and make moves to help you achieve them. The only thing standing in your way is you. Get started today, and happy hunting!

If you’d like to streamline your search and receive additional support, our ESP Legal technical recruiters are always here to help:

Get in Touch with a Recruiter

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ESP Legal Releases 2019 Salary Guide

ESP Legal 2019 Technology and Litigation Salary GuideOur 2019 salary guides present data gathered and analyzed from a wide range of law firms and includes salaries from ESP Legal’s recent placements as well as national and local research.

A Hot Job Market for Tech Staff at Law Firms

In 2018, we reported that 70% of CIOs planned to increase their technology workforce. This year that number has gone up even further—with a projected 75% of companies planning to increase the number of full-time IT employees on their teams, according to the Society for Information Management’s 2019 IT Trends Study. In the legal marketplace specifically, we’ve seen an increase in demand for technology staff, which we anticipate will continue to grow. Help desk, desktop support, security engineer and system and network engineer positions remain in-demand amidst growing security concerns for law firms.

With this high demand has come increased compensation: those holding technology positions at law firms received salary increases of minimally 2% across the board, with application programmers seeing the biggest increase at 10%. Other hot job titles in 2018 included director of KM, CIO/CTO and IT manager.

Work-Life Balance and Benefits Are More Important Than Ever

Candidates continue to express higher interest in better work-life balance, including having the option to work remotely at least part time. Additionally, opportunities for growth including paid trainings and clearly defined career paths remain important. To attract and retain top talent you may need to focus on adding to your offerings or highlighting those you have in the recruitment and interview process—particularly if you’re unable to compete financially with larger firms.

 

With over twenty-three years of legal staffing expertise, ESP Legal continues to monitor and analyze hiring trends, including compensation and benefits in this rapidly changing economy in order to best serve you.

View Legal Technology and Litigation/eDiscovery Salary Guide

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Asking for an Applicant’s Previous Salary is About to Be History

The Salary History Question: Is it History?

A change to the hiring process has been developing across America within the last 12 months. Currently, 8 states, 6 cities, 2 New York counties, and Puerto Rico have banned employers from asking for a candidate’s salary history, and bills are up for debate in several more states. What has spurred this development? After all, it is certainly understandable that employers have wanted to know this information in order to make informed hiring decisions and minimize costs. But lawmakers and advocates have argued that this common practice traps certain individuals in a cycle of underpayment, especially women, minorities, and people moving from places with lower costs of living. Even if your law firm is not located in a state affected by the recent flurry of laws banning the salary history question, we suggest you consider revisiting your hiring process and eliminate such questions. Here are a few reasons why:

A Unified Policy

If you do business across state lines, including places that have already banned the salary history question, or are near states that have, it will be easiest to have a single policy in place for all of your offices. These laws are quickly being debated and added by more and more states and cities (see complete list at the end of this article), so simply adhering to the stricter laws will help ensure that all of your offices are in compliance, and you will save yourself the headache of having to adjust your policies multiple times. After all, complying with these laws does not simply mean that you can no longer ask for a candidate’s salary history. Violations do carry repercussions, so you will need to train your HR staff and recruiters on what kinds of questions are appropriate and legal for compensation discussions. This approach has already been followed by Google, Facebook, Cisco, Bank of America, and Wells Fargo.

A More Accurate Valuation

Asking for someone’s salary history may cause you to undervalue certain candidates due to conditions that have nothing to do with their abilities. As a result, you might lose out on qualified candidates who receive a more competitive offer elsewhere. The goal of these laws is to narrow the pay gaps for women and minorities—if they were underpaid in the past, revealing their salary history puts them at risk for getting underpaid again. Even if their new job actually increases their pay, it will likely still lag behind the standard due to starting from a lower point to begin with. By avoiding the salary history question, law firms can instead focus on paying a candidate a wage determined by their skills and the requirements of the job.

What To Do Instead

Perhaps you’re considering abandoning the salary history question, but are still looking for a way to determine an appropriate salary for a candidate. One option is to simply set a range for the position beforehand and be upfront with the candidate about it. Your scale can account for experience, education, and performance, in order to pay what’s fair. Most of the laws being passed do allow you to discuss salary expectations, which can serve a similar purpose to the salary history question, but leaves the candidate feeling more respected and fairly treated. These strategies will improve your relationship with the candidate and encourage a smooth hiring process.

There are many benefits to complying with the new standards created by these laws, including increased clarity and efficiency for your team during the hiring process, a widened candidate pool, and better candidate relations. In addition, it could help you increase diversity at your law firm, which in turn can improve the bottom line. By adhering to these laws—even if they don’t apply in your state—you make your firm more appealing by empowering your HR department to pay appropriate wages for the position, regardless of an individual’s past pay.

If you’re not sure how to determine fair pay, we’d love to use our knowledge of the legal hiring market to help you out:

Talk to an Account Manager

View Salary Guides

 

Current statewide bans (date of effect): California (1/1/18), Connecticut (1/1/19), Delaware (12/14/17), Hawaii (1/1/19), Massachusetts (7/1/18), NJ (2/1/18 [public only; but senate passed bill this year for all employers]), Oregon (10/6/17), Vermont (7/1/18), Puerto Rico (3/1/17)

In process:  Florida, New Hampshire, New York, and Rhode Island

Current citywide or county bans (date of effect): Albany County, NY (12/17/17), New York City, NY(10/31/17), Philadelphia, PA (on hold), Westchester County, NY (07/09/18)

Note: additional cities have bans for city offices only.

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Finding Your Ideal Law Firm Culture

You spend a LOT of time at work, and while much of your job satisfaction comes from the actual work you do, a large part of it also come from the work culture you’re in. The term “culture fit” gets tossed around as one of the most important factors for both job seekers and employers. But, what does culture fit actually mean? How can you evaluate a law firm’s culture?

Finding Your Ideal Law Firm Culture

For clarification, a healthy law firm culture isn’t about everyone getting along, hanging out on the weekends together, sharing the same interests, or working exactly the same way. Studies have actually shown that the variant perspectives derived from social, racial, and gender diversity, lead to more innovation, better problem-solving, and an improved bottom-line. So a healthy culture isn’t about sameness, but rather about operating from a shared set of values. For example, one law firm may have values of being results-oriented, compassionate, and client-focused, while another values employees who are detail-oriented, respectful, and have fun.

While there is no foolproof way to determine with certainty during the interview process that a potential partnership between an employee and a law firm will work well, our tips below are a good start for evaluating culture fit during the interview process.

What Do You Read?

Before the interview, do a little online research on the law firm to learn more about their values and personality:

  • Are you able to find the values, vision, and/or mission of the law firm on their website? If so, do they align with your own values and vision for your work?
  • What kind of tone does the website use—is it factual and to the point, or more friendly and casual?
  • On their careers page, what words do they use to describe their employees or team? What benefits or perks does the page highlight?
  • Do they promote press about themselves? What do these articles say about the firm?
  • Look at the leadership page and read the bios if they are there. How does what’s highlighted in these bios reveal the law firm’s values?
  • Can you find videos created by the firm? Does the firm have profiles on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, or Instagram? What do these other channels reveal about the law firm’s culture and values?
  • Do they mention pro bono work or charitable efforts? Is this important to you?
  • Look for online reviews from employees and clients. Take these with a grain of salt—the majority of online reviews are complaints, not compliments—but take notice of any patterns in the reviews. If something really jumps out as a potential red flag, prepare to address it before accepting or declining an offer.

Keep in mind, what you see online might not be the whole truth. What a firm claims on their website might not actually exist in the real world and an online review from a disgruntled employee doesn’t reveal the whole story. Still, this online research is a good starting point for developing questions to ask in the interview, observations you’d like to make, and ultimately assessing if the law firm is a good fit for you.

What Do You See?

As you enter a potential future work environment, be ready to take notice of specific choices made by the law firm about the space:

  • Is it an open office set up, or more of an office environment?
  • Is it buzzing with activity, or relatively quiet.
  • Are there private meeting spaces and/or soft furniture areas designed for collaboration?
  • Does the decor give a sense of the culture of the place—are wall decorations inspirational, fun, or traditional?
  • What is the lobby like—bright colored, modern, muted, or dated?
  • Are employees dressed casually in jeans or in traditional business attire?
  • Is there a shared eating area? How is it laid out and furnished?

Set your observations aside as you begin your interview, but plan on assessing them later. Maybe you know that you work better in quiet privacy or that having a nice place to take a break during your day makes you more productive. These environmental things might not seem like they reflect a companies values, but they are usually related. For example, an open office set up is more common at a law firm that values collaboration while as enclosed offices imply that privacy is more highly-valued. The work environment is not the most important aspect of a job, but it is worth considering before accepting a job offer.

What Do You Hear?

Some aspects of culture can easily be discussed in an interview and you should come prepared to ask questions that help you understand the culture of the law firm:

  • How are decisions usually made and communicated at this law firm?
  • What motivates people to stay at this firm long-term?
  • What challenges is the law firm facing and how will those challenges be addressed?
  • What do successful employees look like at this firm?
  • What is the leadership style here?
  • What’s your favorite aspect of working at the law firm?
  • How do you feel the values of the organization are lived out?

In addition to these specific questions, you can understand more about the law firm’s culture by evaluating the questions your interviewer asks you, their interview style, and the things they share with you about the job. There aren’t necessarily right or wrong answers to these questions—what might be a nightmare culture for one person could be an ideal culture for another. Notice if any parts of the conversation raise alarms for you, or conversely, sound highly appealing.

Whether you’ve been burned by a poor culture fit in the past, have had such a good fit you hardly know what we’re talking about, or are somewhere in between, we firmly believe you’ll be your most productive and happiest self when you’re working for a law firm that’s the right culture fit for you. We love helping technologists, litigation support professionals, and attorneys understand what they’re looking for when it comes to law firm culture.

Chat with one of our recruiters today!

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5 Strategies for Creating a Superior Technical Resume

5 Strategies for your legal tech resume

You’ve got six seconds to make an impression with your resume.  How can you possibly show how great you are in so little time?  Good question. The trick to impressing a hiring manager or recruiter in just a few seconds is making your resume as skimmable as possible, and we’ve got some advice to help you do just that:

1. Clarity is King. 

Are you applying for a Senior Systems Engineer position?  Are you currently a Senior Systems Engineer (or have the same responsibilities but a different title)? Put “Senior Systems Engineer” right under your name and contact information. That way, as soon as a reviewer sees your resume they know they’re looking at the right kind of person for the role.

2. Make a Statement.

There’s been a lot of debate on the best way to start your resume. Some will argue for a summary of your career, others will say an objective statement, and still others will say to leave it off altogether. We’re proponents of an expertise or executive summary. The executive summary is best used for higher level manager openings and the expertise summary for technology level openings. This summary makes it quickly evident to those reviewing your resume where your experience lies. Be specific. While these can be very difficult to write, a compelling expertise or executive summary objective, tailored for each job application, will help you stand out, making it well worth the effort.

3. Call Out Your Accomplishments.

One of the biggest mistakes candidates make on their resume is simply listing their responsibilities at previous or current employers. For higher-level openings, hiring managers are really looking for how you did your job, not what you did. Even more so, they want to know how your work and skills tangibly will benefit them as your employer by seeing how you contributed to your past employers. Did you save the company money? Were you more efficient and productive than your peers? While focusing on accomplishments rather than duties is key throughout your resume, calling attention to 3-5 accomplishments in the top third of your resume can really give you an edge over your competition by stealing the hiring manager’s attention right away.

4. Highlight Your Skills.

It’s easy to present your skills in a clean, eye-grabbing way, but many people don’t think to do it. While it’s more common among technology job seekers who often divide their skills into languages, programs, and methods, it is just as valuable for professionals looking for less technical roles. Use this top third of your resume to highlight your skills with a bulleted list or  vertical slashes or dots to separate items listed horizontally. Pro tip: List only the skills that you have mastered, not everything that you have ever done. No one person is an expert in 7 different coding languages or all project management styles, so let your real expertise shine in your skills summary.

5. Keep it Clean.

We’re not talking about your language – though actually, yes, keep that clean too!—we’re warning you against over-populating the top of your resume with unneeded information, confusing formatting, or other clutter. Be concise and direct to help the reader focus on the really important details you are showcasing. Ensure your formatting, punctuation, and spelling are consistent and accurate so as not to give any reason for a reviewer to reject your resume. We also recommend that you leave color off your resume (though some subtle shading can be helpful for organization) and use a basic, professional font.

 

Make the best impression by strategically using the top third of your resume.  Good organization and relevant information will help your recruiter or hiring manager know what you are able to do for them and how you can be a great fit for their law firm. Catch their eye right away and they’ll want to keep reading the rest of your resume.

View sample resumes and download our template

or

Get in touch with one of our recruiters for free resume advice today!

 

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Our Top 7 Recommendations To Help You Hire And Retain Legal Professionals

Tips for hiring and retaining legal pros in 2018As you plan for the year ahead you might be aiming to make your hiring process more efficient, hoping to implement new employee retention initiatives, or analyzing your upcoming projects to identify your hiring needs. Whatever particular challenges you might be facing, 2018 is brimming with opportunities, and our team of experts at ESP Legal has put together these recommendations so you’ll be primed to take advantage of them.

Our Best Advice for Law Firm Hiring Managers in 2018:

1. Make or Promote A Remote Work Policy:

To recruit and maintain the best possible legal talent, make 2018 the year you evaluate your remote work policies. One of the major factors considered by candidates looking to make a career change is their ability to do their work remotely, either regularly or occasionally. If you already have a flexible policy, promote it with prospective hires. If you don’t, consider offering it as a perk to your new hires after they’ve proven themselves and as a reward to employees you are looking to retain. While not all positions allow for frequent remote work, with a structure in place to measure performance, many roles can be successfully executed through telecommuting.

2. Know the Legal Hiring Market:

It’s tight. Unemployment for educated legal professionals and technologists with legal experience is exceptionally low. If you’re looking to hire in the new year, it’s essential that you make yourself aware of what’s realistic to expect from both a skill set and compensation standpoint and draw up your job requirements accordingly.

3. Give Feedback:

If you’re working with a staffing firm, providing feedback in a timely manner is essential. It will help you get the best fit possible by helping your recruiter address concerns, adjust search efforts, and keep your favorite candidate warm while you work through your process. If you’re not working with a firm, feedback is just as important. Acknowledging a thank you note or informing a candidate of your next steps can keep them from losing interest or developing negative feelings about you or your firm.

4. Research Compensation:

The Association of Legal Administrators and the International Legal Technology Association (ILTA) are great resources for detailed compensation guidelines, and ESP Legal also publishes a free annual salary guide for technology, litigation support, and attorney compensation trends. If you are not able to offer a competitive salary as compared to your peers, think strategically about how you can offset this with better benefits, opportunity to grow and learn, and some flexibility in work schedule, and be prepared to sell these advantages to prospective hires.

5. Share Medical Benefits During the Process:

The cost of medical coverage can vary drastically from one firm to the next and can be a big factor for job seekers. If you’re working with a recruitment firm, share medical cost information with your recruiters. We have seen far too many candidates turn down an offer at the last minute because they’ve realized their out of pocket medical expense combined with the salary offered resulted in a decrease in their total compensation. By providing these medical costs in advance, or at least during negotiations, you’ll save yourself time and get the candidate you want.

6. Outsource your Hiring:

We know this may sound self-serving, but many of our clients historically hadn’t used recruiters before 2017 or tried to fill a position without help before sending it to us first, and after working with us have shared their regrets over the time they wasted. By engaging a trusted recruitment firm immediately when a need arises, you’ll get a great candidate on board fast, and minimize effort on your part.

7. Interview Efficiently:

In every area of legal hiring, candidates are in high demand and usually have several irons in the fire. When there are delays in the process, your internal hiring team can become forgetful or distracted and worse, your top candidate may lose interest in you or accept another opportunity before you’ve even prepared to make an offer. Line up all your qualified candidates and interview them in blocks of time over a few days or a week vs. one by one over several weeks. Then schedule internal debriefs with your team so you can compare candidates and make an offer to your top choice as soon as possible. Streamlining and expediting your interview process in these ways can help you make the best hire.

If you’re a hiring manager or department head at a law firm, we hope these recommendations have given you some good ideas and will help make 2018 your most successful year yet. If you’re looking for more personalized advice, our account managers would be thrilled to discuss your unique challenges and help you find the best solutions.

Get in touch

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Our Best Advice to Help You Achieve Your Legal Career Dreams

Career advice for legal professionalsWith a new year comes new opportunity. If you’re a legal technologist, litigation support professional, or attorney looking to advance your career in 2018, our team of experts at ESP Legal has advice for you to make your next year a success.

Our Best Advice for Job Seekers in 2018:

1. Think Beyond Salary: 

If you’re considering making a career move, think about all the factors that would improve your work life, including potential training, skills growth, benefits, commute, and employer flexibility. While salary is obviously a top consideration for you as you seek a new role, these other factors can have just as much of an impact on your happiness.

2. Freshen Your LinkedIn Image:

They might already have your resume in hand, but most managers will still look at your LinkedIn profile to get insight into your background and interests. Take some time to ensure your LinkedIn profile is not only current but also highlights your skills and industry knowledge. Like or share thought leadership articles to add depth to your profile and help you stand out.

3. Be Authentic and Honest:

Whether you’re networking, representing yourself on paper, or sharing about your background with a recruiter or in an interview, honesty is really the best policy. Often we think we have to sell ourselves as this know-it-all to get a job, but you might find the best way to build relationships and be successful is by being yourself.

4. Ask for More:

Don’t be afraid to ask for more responsibility, variety, mentoring and money. Your current employer will respect you for it and be excited to have someone on their team who is seeking professional growth within the law firm. As a bonus, you’ll be improving your career now and building your resume for the future.

5. Avoid Generic Phrases and Clichéd Statements:

Have you ever been guilty of telling a job interviewer that your biggest weakness is that you work too much or that you’d always dreamed of working at their law firm (even though you hadn’t heard about it until the week before)? You may think those answers paint you as the perfect candidate, but your interviewer has heard that all before and those statements are unlikely to help your chances of landing the job. Instead of relying on the banal, try personalizing each answer with key points from both your experience and personality.

6. Think Creatively about Medical Coverage:

With rising costs, medical coverage has been a top consideration for many of our candidates. These benefits can vary significantly from firm to firm and there are also independent coverage plans that could better cover the needs of your family at a lower cost than your new employer’s plan. Be flexible and consider all your options before accepting or turning down an offer. With this creative approach, you may be able to save some money and still get that perfect job for your career.

7. Request Flexibility:

Many job seekers rank remote work and a flexible schedule as top priorities for their next job. While telecommuting is a huge benefit in today’s world it shouldn’t be a deal breaker when making a career choice. Many law firms that do not have a formal remote work policy tend to show flexibility for employees who have proven themselves. Before you decide to leave a great job in order to work from home, ask your employer if they can accommodate your desire to work remote one or two days a week. Be proactive by providing them with a means to measure your productivity from home.

8. Prepare for Interviews:

We know this seems basic, but preparation really is the key to success. Fortunately for candidates, hiring managers often ask the same questions. What are your strengths? What are your weaknesses? Where do you see yourself in five years? Why should we hire you? Take the opportunity to prepare some excellent responses, using specifics to provide the kind of information your interviewers are really looking for, and practice keeping your interview responses short and to the point.

9. Don’t Worry about Golden Handcuffs:

We see a lot of job seekers pass on great opportunities because they’re waiting to receive their year-end bonus in mid-Spring of the new year. While for some this might be worth it, if you’re ready to move on from your current role, we encourage you to hear about opportunities and consider making that move before your bonus comes through. It’s a candidate driven market and there are vast opportunities out there that could not only lead to a significant increase in your compensation, but also greater job satisfaction.

2018 might be your year to get a promotion, make a career change, or join a different law firm, and if so, we hope this advice will serve you well. We truly believe every individual’s needs and career search are unique which is why our recruiters would love to offer you more personalized advice.

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Happy Thanksgiving from ESP Legal

Happy Thanksgiving from ESP Legal

This artwork was done by RAD Camper, April. RAD Camp is helping children and adults in Southern California Rise Above Disabilities! Learn more at www.radcamp.org

This Thanksgiving, we wanted to take a moment to say thank you to our law firms, legal professionals, and other partners who worked with us this year.

ESP continued to experience exciting growth in 2017. Our legal technology staffing group is thriving, and we’ve been pleased to expand both our technology executive search practice and our attorney staffing division. We thank you for the opportunity to serve you and look forward to continuing our partnership with you in 2018.

Happy Thanksgiving from all of us at ESP Legal!

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Law Firms & Cyber Security: 11 Tasks for Prevention & Response

Cyber Security Tasks for your CSOIs worrying about a security breach keeping you up at night? What will your clients think if it happens? Will you lose business? Are you prepared to stop the breach quickly? Can you afford to invest in information security? Can you afford not to?

Since 2011, 80 percent of the largest 100 law firms (by revenue) have been victims of cybercrime, according to an ABA report. The same survey revealed that 26% of law firms with 500 or more attorneys experienced a security breach in 2016. If this issue wasn’t keeping you up at night already, those statistics seem to be cause for some tossing and turning.

While in the past the legal industry had a reputation for being slow to adopt, a recent study found that on all security ratings measured, legal was the second highest performing. This is great news. Security initiatives are starting to come to fruition. But, many executives at law firms are now accepting that it is less about if a breach will happen, and more about what they are going to do when it happens.

While putting prevention measures in place is still essential, creating a breach response plan is of equal importance. In both cases, having a trusted Chief Information Security Officer (CISO) or Chief Security Officer (CSO) on board who can work well with your executive team is essential for big law firms. If you don’t have a CISO or CSO on your team, we suggest you consider adding one. While outsourced solutions can be sufficient for preventative measures, an internal leader of information security will be much more effective at putting a response plan in place.

Here are 11 tasks to give your leader of information security:

1. Set Up Perimeter Defenses

Most law firms know that setting up perimeter defenses is an essential first step for preventing cyber attacks. Firewalls, intrusion detection systems (IDS), application proxies, and virtual private network (VPN) servers are all important implementations for protecting your data from outside attacks.

2. Take Specific Access Security Measures

One of the next steps is to ensure that security measures are taken to only grant access to files and programs on an “as needed” basis. The fewer end users with access to confidential information the lower risk of that data being breached.

3. Create Clear & Concise Security Policies

A security policy should be written and distributed law firm wide. The key here is to make sure it’s usable – you want your attorneys and administrative professionals to actually read it and be able to easily understand and retain the information in it.

4. Invest in Rapid Detection of Breaches

The faster you can identify a breach and kick hackers out of the system the better. Investing in technology to rapidly detect a breach, be it in the form of in-house security engineers under the supervision of a CISO or an outsourced solution, is well worthwhile.

5. Keep Your Data Off Your Premises

Cloud storage companies are highly effective in keeping your data secure. It’s their job. So if you haven’t already moved your data offsite, it might be worth considering in 2018.

6. Use a Layered Defense System

You want your security engineers to make it as difficult as possible for a hacker to break in to your data, which makes a multi-level defense highly valuable. Some of the ways you can layer your defense system are: two-step encryption, consistent web and network monitoring, implementing a data-loss prevention system, and installing anti-virus and spam filtering software.

7. Educate Your IT Team

Whenever possible, your IT team should be building security measures into your applications and software systems. Have your CISO train your developers to do this and keep your IT team up to date on your various cyber security implementations and changes, so they can train others effectively, and stay on top of the latest cyber risks.

8. Check Your 3rd Parties

One of the more common areas of security breach is actually through one of your third party connections. As more clients are coming to law firms with security requirements, it’s essential that law firms do the same with their own 3rd party resources. You should have a well-documented policy for internal use that you can ask your 3rd parties to adhere to as well. Or request to see their security policies to ensure your data is protected from breaches.

9. Make a Response Plan

Having a system in place to detect and respond to breaches quickly is of equal importance to having effective preventive measures. Cyber threats don’t belong only in IT’s domain. If a breach happens, it will impact everyone in your firm, including your clients. As such, your entire executive team must be aware of cyber risks, prevention and response plans, and ideally be involved in their development in collaboration with your CISO or CSO.

10. Practice That Response Plan

Once you’ve created a response plan, practice it. Yes, we know that isn’t billable time, but when a breach happens, you’ll be thankful it is not the first time you’re figuring out who is responsible for what and seeing if your plan actually works.

11. Train Your Attorneys & Administrators

Phishing attacks are highly effective for breaching your law firm’s security. That’s why training your employees is so important for preventing attacks. While classes can be helpful as an overview, technology simulations that give them practice recognizing and reporting phishing emails are even more effective for employee’s retention of their training. It’s also essential that you get your employees to agree to encrypt emails and files and understand why it’s important. Give frequent reminders emphasizing the value and necessity of your securities policies to help prevent attorneys and administrators from falling back into old habits.

 

Equally critical to having your leader of security take these tasks in hand is making sure that you are always testing and staying up to date on the latest security practices. Just like you’d hold a fire drill to practice getting your employees safely out of the building, testing your systems to make sure they are secure will ensure you’re ready to handle a breach when it occurs. To ensure the safety of your data and your client’s data, use “white hat” hackers and penetration testing systems on a regular basis (perhaps quarterly) to test your security system and find areas of vulnerability. In addition, from the top down, build a culture at your law firm where everyone takes responsibility for preventing breaches and responding to them if they occur.

The above list may seem like a lot to take on, but breach prevention and response is now a critical priority for all law firms. Implement some or all of the above suggestions, and you’ll start sleeping more soundly knowing that your law firm and your clients’ data are secure.

Start Your Executive searchA strong CISO, CSO, or CIO can be invaluable for your cyber security risk and response measures. If you’re currently without this essential role on your team, we’re here to help.

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